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Why zoo and circus are bad for animals

http://www.peta.org/living/entertainment/reality-zoos/

The Reality of Zoos

The following article was written by Michelle Carr.

Confused Animal Lover from St. Louis writes, “I’m a huge animal lover, and I understand why the circus is bad for animals, but what about zoos?”

Great question! Many people aren’t aware of the cruelty behind zoos, so it’s good that you’re thinking about animals used for entertainment. When I was a kid, I went to the zoo all the time with my family. I loved pandas as a kid (still do!), and I thought being able to see them in person would be neat. But once I saw them “up close and personal,” I realized that the animals were miserable. It instantly became very clear to me that the animals imprisoned in zoos are sad and don’t want to be kept in artificial environments, have people gawk at them, listen to children who bang on the windows of their enclosures, or have cameras flashing in their faces. To put it simply, zoos are imprisoning animals who want to be free.

Captive animals are deprived of everything that is natural and important to them, and as a result, they become bored and lonely and many even suffer from a condition called “zoochosis.” If you’ve ever witnessed a captive animal rock and sway back and forth, you’ve seen the disease firsthand. This condition is so rampant in zoos that some zoos give animals a mood-altering drug, such as Prozac, because the public has started to catch on.

Some animals are so unhappy that they risk their lives in desperate attempts to free themselves. At the Dallas Zoo, a gorilla named Jabari tried to escape by jumping over the walls and moats of his enclosure, only to be fatally shot by police. A witness later confessed that teenagers were taunting him by throwing rocks.

Animals are unable to thrive in small enclosures, especially with unnatural weather and climates. For example, elephants typically walk up to 30 miles in just one day, but Lucy,  the lone elephant at the Edmonton Zoo, is locked inside a barn when the zoo is closed and during Edmonton’s frigid winter months, which means she spends most of her time indoors, without much room to move. The near-constant confinement because of the harsh weather has caused Lucy to develop painful arthritis.

In reality, most people only spend a few seconds at each display, waiting for the animals to do something “exciting,” but they gain little, if any, true understanding of the animals. In addition, captive animals don’t get to choose their mates, and they are sometimes artificially inseminated so that their babies can be sold or traded to other zoos. This often results in miscarriages, death at birth, or the mother’s rejection of her young. The Chinese government “rents” pandas to zoos worldwide for fees of more than $1 million per year!

Traveling and roadside zoos are even crueler. Animals are often kept in barren cages, such as concrete pens, and in stressful environments, with nothing more than an old tire or a log to stimulate their minds and enrich their lives. People have also been sickened—and some have died—after contracting diseases from animals in petting zoos.

Instead of going to the zoo, you can learn about animals by watching nature documentaries or observing the animals in their own natural habitats instead. Now that I know the reality behind zoos, I don’t go to the zoo, and I encourage my friends and family to boycott them as well. I love animals, and I want to see them free, not held captive behind bars!

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  • http://www.peta.org/features/zoo-animal-abuse/

    Zoos are businesses that capitalize on breeding, buying, and selling animals. Their main priority is profit, not animal welfare. How do we know?

    1. Because these penguins are on anti-depressants.

    Penguins at Zoo

    The Humboldt penguins at Scarborough Sea Life Centre have been prescribed antidepressants because they’re so unhappy.

    2. Because this giraffe was killed and fed to lions when he had outlived his “usefulness.” (NSFW)

    Marius the Giraffe

    3. Because a gorilla was shot and killed after escaping from an “award-winning” exhibit at the Dallas Zoo.

    Dallas Zoo Gorillas

    4. Because the Gaza Zoo painted stripes on these donkeys to make them look like zebras.

    painted-donkeys-zebras

    5. Because in 2003, the San Diego Zoo and Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo imported 11 captured African elephants from Swaziland.

    Elephants-San-Diego-Zoo

    Elephants are good for ticket sales, and even the biggest zoos steal them from the wild.

    6. Because in 2006, several accredited zoos imported 33 monkeys who had been illegally trafficked by poachers in Africa.

    Squirrel-Monkey-Lincoln-Childrens-Zoo

    They could have worked with wildlife rehabilitators to return the primates to their natural habitat.

    7. Because 90 percent of public aquariums studied had animals who demonstrated stereotypic (neurotic) behavior.

    Fish in Aquarium

    These included interacting with invisible boundaries, repeatedly raising their heads above the surface of the water, spinning around an imaginary object, and frequently turning on one side and rubbing along the floor of the tank.

    8. Because from 2006 to 2009, Missouri’s Dickerson Park Zoo handed over “surplus” giraffes, zebras, kangaroos, wallabies, and exotic antelopes to questionable entities.

    Bongo in Zoo

    These included Buddy Jordan, a notorious animal dealer who is known to have sold animals to hunting ranches, exotic-animal breeders, dealers, and unaccredited zoos.

    9. Because New Jersey’s Cape May County Zoo sold two giraffes to an animal broker who then sold them to a traveling circus.

    giraffe-in-zoo

    10. Because when baby animals who are exhibited in the Minnesota Zoo’s yearly farm display grow up and lose their youthful appeal, the zoo sends them to livestock auctions.

    Sheep Live Export

    From there, many are ultimately sent to slaughter.

    11. Because the chief of veterinary services at the Cleveland Zoo has even called on members of the zoo community to support the use of surplus zoo animals in medical experimentation.

    Frick Monkey In Lab

    12. Because a bear starved to death at the Toledo Zoo after zoo officials locked her up to hibernate without food or water.

    They didn’t know that her species doesn’t hibernate.

    13. Because a kangaroo at the Cleveland Zoo had to be euthanized after being struck by a train running through the exhibit. 

    cleveland-zoo-kangaroo

    She was at least the fifth animal to be struck by the train.

     
    Reply
  • https://www.causes.com/actions/1731128-u-s-national-guard-ban-kangaroo-boxing-acts

    The Stardust aka Star family circus. The circus features a kangaroo boxing act. By sponsoring these events the National Guard, a form of the U.S. military is endorsing animal cruelty.

    Forcing kangaroos to box with humans is stressful to the naturally gentle animals, kangaroos kept for such events have contracted illnesses and died, and that fighting animals is forbidden under Mississippi law, as is hosting such a fight.

    Since 2005, Star Family Circus has been cited by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for nearly two dozen Animal Welfare Act violations involving kangaroos, including failing to provide a kangaroo with adequate veterinary care and failing to house a kangaroo in a structurally sound facility that protects the animal from injury. Two kangaroos used by a different exhibitor for cruel boxing matches have died while touring one kangaroo from complications of a deadly bacterial disease called "lumpy jaw," which can result from extreme crowding, poor hygiene and diet, and stressful conditions.

    Reply
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